Huntington Beach Pedestrian Accident Lawsuit Accuses Police Officer of Talking on Cell Phone While Driving

December 31, 1969

Catherine Sanchez has filed a Huntington Beach personal injury lawsuit over injuries she says that she sustained in an Orange County, California pedestrian accident last May. The 47-year-old woman says she suffered physical and emotional harm when she was hit by a car driven by a Huntington Beach cop. Sanchez claims the officer was talking on his cell phone and also speeding.

A police supervisor that arrived at the scene chose not to file an incident report. According to the police, on the day of the alleged Huntington Beach pedestrian accident Sanchez didn't tell them that she'd been struck by the police car and they believe that her son pulled her out of the way just in time. However, Sanchez disputes their account. She claims that the vehicle struck her on the left side of her body, which left her with bruises and in pain. She also contends that the officer allegedly involved in the accident reportedly stopped, yelled at her, and then drove off.

Now, Sanchez is seeking $500,000 in Huntington Beach personal injury damages.

If distracted driving played a role in causing the police officer to strike Sanchez, there is a good chance the city of Huntington Beach could be ordered to pay damages for the harm that she suffered. If the officer accidentally struck her with his vehicle and then left the scene without getting her medical help, that would also be an act of negligence and likely grounds for Huntington Beach personal injury compensation.

Distracted Driving
Texting, talking on a cell phone, watching a video, surfing the Internet, and sending emails can prove to be dangerous activities when done while operating a motor vehicle. In California, there is a ban on the use of handheld cell phones while driving. Texting while driving is also banned. That said, talking on a hands free set can also prove distracting enough to case an Orange County, California car crash. Distracted driving is dangerous and can be grounds for a Huntington Beach injury claim.

Over the last few years, there has been a greater effort by lawmakers and safety advocates to provide statistics while educating the masses about this dangerous driving habit. The facts and evidence supporting this continue to mount.

For example, according to a recent study that took place at Texas A&M University's Texas Transportation Institute, motorists that are texting whie driving take two times as long to react to traffic signals as those that aren't sending text messages.

Drivers were tested on an 11-mile course. They were told to stop when they saw a flashing yellow light. While the motorists who weren't texting took no more than a second to respond to a flashing light, those who were texting took three to four seconds. Drivers who were texting had an 11 times greater chance of not seeing the flashing signal.

Recent study shows reaction time doubled by distracted drivers, The Times Herald, October 9, 2011

Woman claims officer hit her with car, Huntington Beach Independent, September 28, 2011


Related Web Resources:
Distracted Driving, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Cell Phone and Texting Laws, Governors Highway Safety Association


More Blog Posts:
Huntington Beach Car Crash Lawsuit: Driver Rear-Ended in Accident That Killed Baby in Crosswalk Sues Distracted Driver, California Injury Lawyers, September 29, 2011

Number of California Car Crashes Not Going Down Despite Handheld Cell Phone and Texting while Driving Bans, Says HLDI, California Injury Lawyers, January 30, 2010

Los Angeles Car Accident: Lawsuit Blames the County, the City of Santa Clarita Over Woman's Wrongful Death While Watching July 4 Fireworks, California Injury Lawyers, June 24, 2011