$4.9M California Traumatic Brain Injury Settlement Reached with High School Football Player's Family

December 31, 1969

The family of Scott Eveland has settled their California traumatic brain injury lawsuit against manufacturer Riddell and the San Marcos Unified School District for almost $4.9 million. Eveland is the high school football player who sustained a severe head injury during a game in 2007. Per the terms of the California injury case, Riddell will pay $500,000 and the school district will pay $4.375 million.

Court documents reveal that the 17-year-old went to his Mission Hills High School's football team trainer and complained of a bad headache. The linebacker said he was having problems focusing his eyes and asked to remain on the bench during a game. The trainer told head coach Chris Hauser, who insisted Eveland to play, and the teenager ended up collapsing from a brain bleed.

According to Eveland's mom, Diane Luth, her son is now severely and permanently disabled. Although his mind is still sharp, he has problems speaking and can only answer questions by typing on a keyboard.

Riddell has been under fire for some time because amateur and professional football players have accused the sports equipment manufacturer of making helmets that fail to do the job of properly protecting athletes during games. Pro players have even filed products liability lawsuits accusing Riddell and the National Football League of negligence. Many athletes claim that they were never warned that sustaining concussions while playing football might later leave them with permanent brain damage, other related impairments, and even cause death.

"The issue of whether schools and their sports teams do enough to protect their athletes from injuries has long been under debate," said Howard Law, PC and Orange County, California Traumatic Brain Injury Lawyer Vincent Howard.

In recent years, there are coaches and trainers that have forced athletes to keep working out during training or continue playing a game under severe conditions and even after a student has complained about feeling unwell or has a known history of health issues. Some of these instances have proven fatal or left some athletes with serious injuries.

Head Injuries in American Football
Concussions have been known to occur frequently in American football. Even when no serious injury from a concussion is immediately apparent, there may be permanent damage.

Concussions can lead to speech impairments, memory issues, concentration problems, and other neurological difficulties. According to neurologists, a person who sustains a concussion has a four times greater chance of suffering another one. Also, someone who has had numerous concussions is more likely to sustain another even without experiencing a blow to a head. Recovery may take longer.

Amateur students are not immune from the severity of the game. According to The New York Times, since 1997, at least 50 high schools and younger football players in over 20 states have died or suffered a serious head injury on the field.

Study Ranks 10 Football Helmets for Concussion Safety, Time, May 10, 2011

Young Players, Serious Injuries, The New York Times, September 16, 2007


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"Schools and their teams must do what is necessary to protect their athletes from severe injuries and illness. This means placing each student's health and well-being above any win," said Anaheim Brain Injury Attorney Vincent Howard. Failure to properly supervise and prevent a football player from getting hurt due to negligence can be grounds for an Anaheim personal injury lawsuit.

Contact Orange County, California Child Injury Lawyer Vincent Howard today.